Rich Dad Poor Dad | Lesson 1: The Rich Don’t Work For Money

Rich Dad Poor Dad | Lesson 1: The Rich Don’t Work For Money

Hey everyone! My brother gave me this infamous book to read, so I wanted to document my thoughts, feelings and actions each chapter.

Since the beginning of the year (2019), life has felt a little lack-lustre. I needed a new focus. Something that would level-up my thinking. This book is exactly that!

If you’re interested in some golden nuggets of advice, join me on this journey of learning!

Chapter Summary.

As you might imagine, the first chapter covers the beginning of Robert Kiyosaki’s journey to financial education and freedom.

It follows Rob and Mike’s journey (Rob’s childhood best friend) getting a job from Mike’s dad in exchange to learn how to make money. They earned 10 cents an hour. Later, they worked without pay.

Throughout the chapter, Robert examines his rich dad’s thoughts about work and money versus his poor dad’s thoughts toward work and money. I found this particularly fascinating. I’ve grown passionate about mindset and how powerful our minds can be when it comes to overcoming life’s barriers.

Fear & Greed.

Rich Dad emphasised the fact that we must be honest with how we feel if we were to change our thinking. He mentioned that all people are ruled by two emotions: fear and greed.

The fear of being without money is the force that gets us up in the morning and go to work. Then greed comes every time we get paid: we imagine all the things that money can buy. The pattern then continues.

If we can admit to ourselves how we really feel, we can then stop reacting emotionally and start to think logically. We can ‘free ourselves’ from this trap.

Mindset.

Something that stood out to me, was rich dad’s sentiments about why people think the way they think: because that’s all they know!

Parents pass down their knowledge from their own parents and so goes the cycle. It’s important to reflect on that for a moment. What values were you given as a child? Do you agree with them still or were there a few you discarded?

Similarly, those who go to school, are taught how to be a good worker, not how to manage money well.

Whether it’s our parents or society, we all have a different perspective about work ethic and finance.

“Being broke is temporary. Being poor is eternal.”

First, be aware of how you relate to money.

Change your perspective from fear, to opportunity.

Fear is an instinctual emotion to enable us to survive. Once we override this fear, our potential becomes endless.

Personal Reflections.

My view of money is similar to the majority. Scarcity and fear was a common theme growing up as a kid. Whether it was financial, educational, physical or emotional — I would be afraid.

I was taking on a blueprint for how I saw the world and myself from my family and from society.

From 22 years old onwards, I have been breaking these barriers and overcoming fears in all aspects of life.

I’ve been chipping away slowly. We can’t always jump in the deep-end. We must first learn to swim. That’s my approach at least!

My impression of this chapter was that a lot of people continue in this “rat race” of life and never question why they do the things they do. I could definitely relate to this as there was a portion of my life from 18 to around 22 years old where I was financially careless.

Even now as a 25 year old, I don’t always make wise decisions when it comes to finances. However, I’ve come leaps and bounds from my 18 year old self; I no longer spend money mindlessly.

Rich dad offered jobs to Rob and Mike to teach them a lesson. I resonated with this as I have been blinded by this ‘race to get paid more and more’.
Back then, this way of thinking paid for my necessities: rent, food and car expenses.

As I read each page, and each nugget of wisdom Rich Dad shared, I realised that I still have Poor Dad thoughts: afraid of not having ‘enough’ in case of an emergency. Thinking about jobs that will pay more money.

This year, this pressure to ‘earn’ became unbearable. Although it motivated me to find a volunteering role and that lead to a full-time contract, I was still operating from a place of deep fear.

On the other hand, as the year has progressed, I have started thrifting, flipping online and cutting down expenses so I can keep more than I spend.

After all, it’s not what you make, it’s what you keep.

Fear and greed are emotions I’ll always have. What matters most, is how I respond.

The rich don’t work for money. The rich have money work for them.

Rich Dad

I’ve heard this quote throughout my life and had no idea what it meant. I didn’t care to know as a kid.

Now, as an adult and with experience in the way of thinking as Poor Dad, the lessons in the book make sense.

I always thought I was ‘too dumb‘ to learn a bout investment. My strengths are in art and writing, not in evaluating risks!

However, after completing this first chapter, I think there’ll be a lot of valuable information I will be able to action in no time!

Final notes.

Each chapter has a “Study Session” at the end. Answering the prompts helped me sift through my thoughts.

Surprisingly, I’d answered several of these questions in the last few years.

It was validating to know that the videos, articles and podcasts I’ve been listening to aligns with this “abundant” way of thinking.

I have a long way to go but I am confident this book will continue to help me break down my fear of money. If you’re interested in this book, I’ve included a link below! [Note: Affiliate Link]

On to the next chapter!

Have you read this book yet? If so, which lesson did you resonate with most? What did you find challenging?

Read Rich Dad Poor Dad now and change your money mindset!

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Finding Creativity At Work

Finding Creativity At Work

 

The little waitress.

Most people who know me, know that I worked in hospitality for a number of years. Running food, washing dishes, making drinks and taking orders – the usual front-of-house/all-rounder duties. Although I enjoyed hospitality for it’s fast-pace and it’s people, I could not be creative. I could neatly arrange table decor, fold pizza boxes and garnish fresh smoothies (I LOVED doing these tasks), but I could not pour beautiful latte-art for the life of me. One reason was that I lacked training, and the other was that the year I tried latte-art, was the year I knew something finally needed to change. Instead of creativity, I focused on building rapport with customers, doing my best to ensure they enjoyed their experience wherever I worked (I have previously worked in cafes, restaurants, clubs). Continue reading “Finding Creativity At Work”