Rich Dad Poor Dad | Lesson 1: The Rich Don’t Work For Money

Rich Dad Poor Dad | Lesson 1: The Rich Don’t Work For Money

Hey everyone! My brother gave me this infamous book to read, so I wanted to document my thoughts, feelings and actions each chapter.

Since the beginning of the year (2019), life has felt a little lack-lustre. I needed a new focus. Something that would level-up my thinking. This book is exactly that!

If you’re interested in some golden nuggets of advice, join me on this journey of learning!

Chapter Summary.

As you might imagine, the first chapter covers the beginning of Robert Kiyosaki’s journey to financial education and freedom.

It follows Rob and Mike’s journey (Rob’s childhood best friend) getting a job from Mike’s dad in exchange to learn how to make money. They earned 10 cents an hour. Later, they worked without pay.

Throughout the chapter, Robert examines his rich dad’s thoughts about work and money versus his poor dad’s thoughts toward work and money. I found this particularly fascinating. I’ve grown passionate about mindset and how powerful our minds can be when it comes to overcoming life’s barriers.

Fear & Greed.

Rich Dad emphasised the fact that we must be honest with how we feel if we were to change our thinking. He mentioned that all people are ruled by two emotions: fear and greed.

The fear of being without money is the force that gets us up in the morning and go to work. Then greed comes every time we get paid: we imagine all the things that money can buy. The pattern then continues.

If we can admit to ourselves how we really feel, we can then stop reacting emotionally and start to think logically. We can ‘free ourselves’ from this trap.

Mindset.

Something that stood out to me, was rich dad’s sentiments about why people think the way they think: because that’s all they know!

Parents pass down their knowledge from their own parents and so goes the cycle. It’s important to reflect on that for a moment. What values were you given as a child? Do you agree with them still or were there a few you discarded?

Similarly, those who go to school, are taught how to be a good worker, not how to manage money well.

Whether it’s our parents or society, we all have a different perspective about work ethic and finance.

“Being broke is temporary. Being poor is eternal.”

First, be aware of how you relate to money.

Change your perspective from fear, to opportunity.

Fear is an instinctual emotion to enable us to survive. Once we override this fear, our potential becomes endless.

Personal Reflections.

My view of money is similar to the majority. Scarcity and fear was a common theme growing up as a kid. Whether it was financial, educational, physical or emotional — I would be afraid.

I was taking on a blueprint for how I saw the world and myself from my family and from society.

From 22 years old onwards, I have been breaking these barriers and overcoming fears in all aspects of life.

I’ve been chipping away slowly. We can’t always jump in the deep-end. We must first learn to swim. That’s my approach at least!

My impression of this chapter was that a lot of people continue in this “rat race” of life and never question why they do the things they do. I could definitely relate to this as there was a portion of my life from 18 to around 22 years old where I was financially careless.

Even now as a 25 year old, I don’t always make wise decisions when it comes to finances. However, I’ve come leaps and bounds from my 18 year old self; I no longer spend money mindlessly.

Rich dad offered jobs to Rob and Mike to teach them a lesson. I resonated with this as I have been blinded by this ‘race to get paid more and more’.
Back then, this way of thinking paid for my necessities: rent, food and car expenses.

As I read each page, and each nugget of wisdom Rich Dad shared, I realised that I still have Poor Dad thoughts: afraid of not having ‘enough’ in case of an emergency. Thinking about jobs that will pay more money.

This year, this pressure to ‘earn’ became unbearable. Although it motivated me to find a volunteering role and that lead to a full-time contract, I was still operating from a place of deep fear.

On the other hand, as the year has progressed, I have started thrifting, flipping online and cutting down expenses so I can keep more than I spend.

After all, it’s not what you make, it’s what you keep.

Fear and greed are emotions I’ll always have. What matters most, is how I respond.

The rich don’t work for money. The rich have money work for them.

Rich Dad

I’ve heard this quote throughout my life and had no idea what it meant. I didn’t care to know as a kid.

Now, as an adult and with experience in the way of thinking as Poor Dad, the lessons in the book make sense.

I always thought I was ‘too dumb‘ to learn a bout investment. My strengths are in art and writing, not in evaluating risks!

However, after completing this first chapter, I think there’ll be a lot of valuable information I will be able to action in no time!

Final notes.

Each chapter has a “Study Session” at the end. Answering the prompts helped me sift through my thoughts.

Surprisingly, I’d answered several of these questions in the last few years.

It was validating to know that the videos, articles and podcasts I’ve been listening to aligns with this “abundant” way of thinking.

I have a long way to go but I am confident this book will continue to help me break down my fear of money. If you’re interested in this book, I’ve included a link below! [Note: Affiliate Link]

On to the next chapter!

Have you read this book yet? If so, which lesson did you resonate with most? What did you find challenging?

Read Rich Dad Poor Dad now and change your money mindset!

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My Journey on Discovering Self-worth.

My Journey on Discovering Self-worth.

The first layer: illness.

As a child, I knew I was loved. I knew there were people around me who (mostly) loved to fuss over me, brush my hair, make sure my seat belt was on and made sure I had a hot milo for supper before bed (thanks grandma!).

Being born premature, my early childhood consisted of multiple hospital visits. Doctors and nurses would check if I was growing normally, if my lungs were functioning well (being diagnosed with asthma) and if I was learning at a similar rate to other children my age.

I was in and out of hospital a lot due to severe asthma attacks and on two separate occasions, I was treated for pneumonia.

All of that coupled with having a fast metabolism, the food I ate burned quicker than my parents could feed me so I was a skinny kid.

A family friend was over one night, chatting with my parents. He must’ve thought I was too young to understand him so he asked in a casual tone, “Is she sick?”. His head jerked slightly to imply me standing behind him.

Fear set in quickly.

I ran down the hall into my parents’ bedroom.

The feeling of shame welled-up inside.

I cried silently. I was confused. He just asked a simple question. So why did it hurt me so much?

As I said, I knew there were people who loved me, but that night was a turning point in how I saw myself. I began to wonder if I was actually sick.

I wondered if there was something wrong with me.

The second layer: obedience & perfection.

Before I started primary school, I learned about obedience like most children do. If you behaved well, there was a reward. If you misbehaved it meant consequences. For me and my siblings, consequences often meant physical punishment. Being obedient was the name of the game and being fearful was a by-product of ‘playing’.

Throughout primary school and high school, I would fail or end up with sub-par results when my school report came. I excelled in English and Art but everything else was a struggle.

When I’d ask for help at home, it was met with the common response:

“You don’t know anything! How could you not know this yet?!”

That familiar feeling of shame welled-up inside.

I stopped asking for help.

At 15, I got my first job. Little did I know, asking for help would be a hard lesson to learn.

The third layer: religion & fear.

Throughout my childhood and adolescence, church was a family ritual most Sundays. We’d sit quietly in the pews, listening to bible readings and the priest summarising a life lesson. As a kid, I spent my time looking at the colourful stained windows. How did they paint so high up?

Sometimes, the children were ushered into the back room that had thick windows. I learned there that children were to be seen but not heard. Church was a sacred place and all sacred places required respect.

As I got older, I learned about how humans were worthless sinners because of the fall of Adam and Eve. Yet, our value was restored by the sacrifice of Jesus Christ. Only Christians had this amazing Saviour.

When I came of age, youth group felt like an oasis in a world of darkness.

I understood that I was worth it because God saw something in me. A loving, kind and just God had a perfect plan for me.

I was saved and this meant freedom for my soul. I knew if I turned away from God, I would be apart from Him for eternity which I didn’t want. The more I learned about eternal suffering, the more scared I became of the afterlife.

It was a good thing to be “God-fearing”.

Because of Him, I had a family. Because of Him, I had strengths and these were a Gift. Because of Him, I could heal when I was hurt. Because of Him, I could forgive because He first forgave my sins.

Years later, my perspective would change from “freedom in religion” to “freedom away from religion”.

Breaking Down The Layers.

Growing up with these layers of self-worth from such a young age would be a challenge through childhood, adolescence and in my adult life.

As a kid, I tried to run away with my brother. We travelled 2 minutes from home and had to be picked up. As a teenager, I struggled to abide by the curfew rules and would come home late. I didn’t trust any adults, not even the school counsellor who tried to help me. I tried to run away from home for the second time. I stopped attending youth group. I stopped listening to sermon videos and reading my bible and ultimately, I left the religion I grew up believing in.

My only comfort besides the friendships I forged, was being creative. I could draw and write for hours on end. I vented my frustrations, questions and motivations.

By the age of 17, my rebellious streak calmed.

At 18, I moved out of home. I started meeting new friends who were kind, confident, care-free and out-spoken. They were beautiful people! Some of them did not have rooted beliefs in religion. How could they be so confident without the guarantee of a Saviour? By the age of 19, I realised that was the life I wanted for myself.

I stripped my life of unneeded baggage emotionally and physically.

I started seeing a counsellor. I had to face the past abuse, exercised control throughout my life and the belief of worthlessness. I now saw my passion for perfection as a strength. Even if I make mistakes, I will always strive for excellence. It doesn’t mean I’m “dumb” or that I “don’t know anything” – it means I am persistent and resilient. I learned how to reframe my mindset.

I began a decluttering journey, getting rid of unusable items. I realised I held onto all my belongings out of comfort and as a distraction to facing the pain I felt within. For a period of time in my life, I felt empty. Instead of becoming self-aware, I kept things I didn’t need to fill the ‘void’. Letting go of my hoarding habit was such a cathartic process.

The more I healed my emotional wounds, the more I realised:

My self-worth was up to me to decide.

No matter what others did or said.

As each year passed, I continued to break down these layers of self-worth that I’d taken on. It is still a work in progress, but a path I am so glad I walked down years ago.

Remember, your worth is not reliant on any thing, person or being.

You are worthy, just because.